Gastric Bypass Surgery How does it Work?

Gastric Bypass

Click Here to Use Our BMI Calculator

How Gastric Bypass Works?

Gastric bypass surgeries and other weight loss medical procedures being performed in the United States are increasing for the last few years. This may be in response for the increase in the number of people suffering from obesity. According to the American Society of Bariatric Surgery, there are about 140,000 gastric bypass being performed every year. Those who have undergone weight loss surgeries, lose about 50 to 60% of their body weight, a year after the surgery. Along with the weight loss, they would also be losing ailments associated with obesity like high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke, heart diseases and even cancer.

The Procedure

The most common gastric bypass performed is called the Roux-en Y gastric bypass. In this procedure, a small pouch is created on the top of the stomach. It is stapled, to seal it off from the rest of the stomach. This small pouch will no longer digest any food. The upper part of the small intestine, the duodenum, is attached to this small pouch. When eating, the food would bypass the small pouch in the stomach and the upper portion of the small intestine. The food would go directly to the middle section of the intestine called the jejunum. Since it is the small intestine that does the absorption of minerals, vitamins and calories, the body will absorb limited calories only. A Y formation is formed just below the stomach. Incisions are made in the abdomen to perform the procedure. Surgeons will be using the laparoscope or a small, tubular instrument with a camera. This will enable the surgeon to see the abdomen and perform the surgery. The laparoscopic gastric bypass actually makes the stay in the hospital and the recovery period shorter and quicker. There are still “open” gastric bypass performed, however, there could be wound-related problems with this kind of procedure. The laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery is performed under general anaesthesia. The procedure lasts for about four hours. Patients who have undergone the procedure stay in the hospital for about two to six days to be monitored for any complications.

Getting A Gastric Bypass: Desperate Times Call For Desperate Measures

Why get a gastric bypass? It sometimes goes like this: Patient've been looking at Patient'sself in the mirror and are looking at all the flab on Patient? Have Patient been laying awake all night as Patient remember Patient's physical difficulties during the day? Life isn't exactly when Patient're overweight and a lot of people try to rid themselves of the fat on their body. The problem is sometimes alll those exercise programs and diets don't exactly work out for those doing them. What do Patient do when Patient's weight yo-yos up and down or, worse, it just won't go down?

 

Well, that's the time when Patient think about getting a surgical option. Liposuctions are a good stopgap option and they can often do the trick – all it takes is a good push and maintaining weight is a lot easier. However, sometimes even that is not enough. The fat keeps on coming back, whether it's just a genetic predesposition to it or something similar. Some people really need help to get them out of obesity's tight embrace. That's where a gastric bypass comes in. A gastric bypass, or as medical professionals call it a “Roux-en-Y gastric bypass”, is a surgical weight-loss procedure that enables the patient to lose weight on a constant and regular basis. It is one of the more safe options and is because of this the preferred option when any weight-loss surgery is being considered. What it does is essentially make a small pouch in the upper part of the stomach, and connect it directly to the middle of Patient's small intestine. This severely cuts down on Patient's caloric intake by skipping most of the intestinal tract and also reduces Patient's appetite by making Patient's stomach handle less food.

The procedure may sound like an easy thing but a gastric bypass is still a major surgical operation and has its own risks. Patient'll be under general anesthesia for this operation and tubes will be inserted via Patient's nose and Patient's abdomen to make sure Patient recover completely after the operation. The operation itself will only take a few hours. It may even be shorter if Patient under go a laparoscopic bypass, a procedure which uses a laparoscope instead of opening Patient's abdomen completely for the operation. This results in less infection and accelerates healing time. After the operation, Patient's doctor will probably keep Patient in the hospital for three to five days for observation. Of course, immediately after the operation Patient will be experiencing a few changes. First of all, in the first three days after the bypass, Patient'll be on an IV drip – no eating until Patient's stomach heals. Then it's twelve weeks of reginemnted diet as Patient progress to solid foods again. Patient'll also be feeling the effects of the gastric bypass. When Patient eat a lot of food or eat quickly, it may cause Patient to vomit or pain. Patient will feel Patient'sself losing weight in the next few months but will also have to suffer the side-effects like weakness, hair loss and body aches. This is why Patient should never undertake a gastric bypass unless it's truly necessary.

Gastric Bypass: What Patient Need to Know Before Patient Go Under the Knife

Tired of all Patient's weight loss methods that don’t work? Surgery may be Patient's only lifesaver. In fact, some overweight people go to greater lengths by going under the knife to be able to lose weight fast. Patient might want to consider gastric bypass surgery to eliminate those unwanted bulges and flabs. In essence, it lowers the volume of the stomach by as much as 30 ml. This procedure, which is sometimes referred to as bariatric surgery, is the most preferred weight loss surgery by surgeons in the United States.

It is because this type of bariatric surgery is much safer and less risky than other weight-loss procedures. Compared with the other type of bariatric surgery (gastric banding surgery), this procedure does not easily lead to weight gain. And with consistent changes in a patient’s lifestyle and behavior, the surgery can result in a long-term and immediate weight loss, as well as other health benefits such as treatment of sleep apnea and type II diabetes.

How safe it is?

The technology used in the weight loss surgery makes the operation much safer than before. Majority of bariatric procedures take advantage of the new laparoscopic technology, which uses a tiny video camera and other instruments to make very small incisions on the abdomen. Whereas before, surgeries of the stomach involved creating large incisions that usually caused intense pain and inflammation to patients. Smaller incisions using the laparoscopic technique leads to less pain, less swelling, fewer scars, and faster recovery rate.

Is this surgery right for Patient?

It depends on Patient's body mass index (BMI). Patient are a candidate for the surgery if Patient's BMI is not less than 40. But if Patient have any serious disease such as pneumonia, bronchitis, or diabetes, Patient's BMI must be at least 35 in order to undergo a weight-loss surgery. Otherwise, the surgeon may not allow Patient to go through the procedure because of the complications. Aside from the right physical condition, Patient must be emotionally and mentally prepared for the surgery. For the operation to be successful, Patient should be properly motivated and aware of the risks or complications that may arise. Also, surgery should always be the last resort—meaning Patient use it only after Patient have tried dieting and exercise but to no avail.

What are the risks?

Of course, any kind of surgery entails some risks due to the incisions involved in the operation. Deaths resulting from the surgery are very rare (about 0.1 to 2 percent). The complications of the surgery are bleeding, respiratory dysfunction, stenosis or the obstruction of stomach, and leaking due to the staples.

How to find the right surgeon?

Choosing the best surgeon is one of the most important decisions to make when it comes to weight-loss surgery. The surgeon is the only person to entrust Patient's life and limb with, so to speak. So he or she must not only be competent, but also a person whom Patient’re comfortable dealing with. Also, look for a surgeon with a vast experience in gastric bypass surgery, preferably someone who has performed hundreds of operations. That way, Patient can be sure that Patient's surgery is safe and effective.

After the Surgery

Having a smaller stomach has effects on how much food the patient can eat. There are special diets that a patient recovering from gastric bypass surgery follows. Every food that the patient would eat will be important for his nutrition. There are times that they are also recommended nutritional supplements to avoid deficiencies like anemia or vitamin deficiency. There are patients reporting weight loss of as much as 50 to 60 percent a year after the surgery. There are even some who would report an astounding 80% weight loss. However, it is still possible for patients to stretch their stomachs and have that large size again. There is still a possibility of getting back those lost pounds. That is why doctors would recommend dietary restrictions and exercise plant that would keep the pounds away. There are also tendencies that gastric bypass patients would develop gallstones, stomach ulcers, hernia or nutritional deficiencies. The part of the stomach which was bypassed can get enlarged, it could cause bloating and hiccups. There is also the Dumping syndrome which happens when the food moves quickly to the small intestine. This can happen after eating foods high in sugar or fat.

Gastric Bypass Tips: Switch to a Healthy Lifestyle after Weight Loss!

Obesity has been one of the major health issues in the United States for a very long time. For the past two decades, the number of obese and overweight people has been growing fast in more than 30 states of America. Beyond the statistics is a more pressing problem: the health problems that come with obesity. Sleep apnea, diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome, and hypertension are just some of these health conditions that are often associated with excess weight. How does one lose weight aside from diet, exercise, and medication? Gastric bypass surgery is a well-know solution for overweight people who need to shed at least 100 lbs. However, surgery alone is not enough to maintain an ideal weight. It must be accompanied by post-surgery lifestyle changes that involve diet, exercise, and mental and emotional adjustments.

The Right Diet after Weight Loss Surgery

The most important thing that a patient should watch out after the surgery is his diet. The surgery involves changing the structure of the stomach and small intestines. The reduced stomach volume following the surgery limits that amount of food that the stomach can hold, which is roughly about 1 ounce. Thus, the patient must be careful with the kind and amount of food he eats. The patient needs to eat small meals at regular intervals everyday. Weeks after the surgery, the patient is required to eat pureed or soft foods for better digestion and to avoid complications such as nausea and vomiting. Examples of foods that can be eaten after surgery are pureed fruits, pureed vegetables, soups, oatmeal, and steamed desserts.

Formal Exercise Program

A day following the surgery, the patient can do some light walking—but not regular exercises yet. Two to three weeks are needed for rest and healing, and a formal exercise program can start as soon as the patient has fully recovered. Usually, weight loss surgery patients can start low-impact aerobic workouts four to six weeks following the surgery. The recommended exercises for those who have undergone weight loss surgery include yoga, Pilates, water aerobics, resistance band exercises, speed walking, and light jogging.

Psychotherapy

While it seems that weight loss surgery involves only the physiological aspect of the patient, the mental and emotional aspects must not be overlooked. Most surgeons recommend psychotherapy that people who are considering weight loss surgery. Psychotherapy prepares a person’s mind and emotions before the surgery so that he could cope easily with the bodily and lifestyle changes after the procedure. Failure to undergo psychotherapy prior to the surgery may lead to post-procedure problems such as eating disorders, constant food cravings, and emotional troubles.

Stress Management

To many people, eating is a great stress reliever. The diet limitations after surgery can be very stressful for many patients. What’s the best way to beat stress after surgery? Not food, not drugs, and not treatments. Simple changes in lifestyle can turn stressful days into comfortable and worry-free ones. Stress management techniques for people who have gone through weight loss surgery include deep breathing and relaxation techniques, acupuncture, yoga, massage therapy, and meditation. Trying a new hobby and joining support groups in one’s community are also good ways to manage stress after weight loss surgery. Gastric bypass surgery is the best remedy for obesity when diet, exercise, and medications fail. But even the most successful procedures won’t lead to weight loss without the right lifestyle changes. To help achieve a healthy lifestyle and effective weight loss, one must seek professional help from health care professionals, dieticians, and psychotherapists.