Frequently asked question about Hemorrhoids

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Hemorrhoids (PILES)

What are hemorrhoids?

A hemorrhoids can be described as masses or clumps ("cushions") of tissue within the anal canal that contain blood vessels and the surrounding, supporting tissue made up of muscle and elastic fibers. The anal canal is the last four centimeters through which stool passes as it goes from the rectum to the outside world. The anus is the opening of the anal canal to the outside world. Although most people think hemorrhoids are abnormal, they are present in everyone. It is only when the hemorrhoidal cushions enlarge that hemorrhoids can cause problems and be considered abnormal or a disease.

Prevalence of hemorrhoids

Although hemorrhoids occur in everyone, they become large and cause problems in only 4% of the general population. Hemorrhoids that cause problems are found equally in men and women, and their prevalence peaks between 45 and 65 years of age.

Anatomy of hemorrhoids

The arteries supplying blood to the anal canal descend into the canal from the rectum above and form a rich network of arteries that communicate with each other around the anal canal. Because of this rich network of arteries, hemorrhoidal blood vessels have a ready supply of arterial blood. This explains why bleeding from hemorrhoids is bright red (arterial blood) rather than dark red (venous blood), and why occasionally bleeding from hemorrhoids can be severe. The blood vessels that supply the hemorrhoidal vessels pass through the supporting tissue of the hemorrhoidal cushions. The anal veins drain blood away from the anal canal and the hemorrhoids. These veins drain in two directions. The first direction is upwards into the rectum, and the second is downwards beneath the skin surrounding the anus. The dentate line is a line within the anal canal that denotes the transition from anal skin (anoderm) to the lining of the rectum.

Formation of hemorrhoids

Internal hemorrhoid: If the hemorrhoid originates at the top (rectal side) of the anal canal, it is known as an internal hemorrhoid.

External hemorrhoid: If the hemorrhoid originates at the lower end of the anal canal near the anus, it is known as an external hemorrhoid

Technically, the differentiation between internal and external hemorrhoids is made on the basis of whether the hemorrhoid originates above or below the dentate line (internal and external, respectively). As discussed previously, hemorrhoidal cushions in the upper anal canal are made up of blood vessels and their supporting tissues. There usually are three major hemorrhoidal cushions oriented:

  • left lateral
  • right anterior, and
  • right posterior,

During the formation of enlarged internal hemorrhoids, the vessels of the anal cushions swell and the supporting tissues increase in size. The bulging mass of tissue and blood vessels protrudes into the anal canal where it can cause problems. Unlike with internal hemorrhoids, it is not clear how external hemorrhoids form.

What causes hemorrhoids?

There are several causes, including inadequate intake of fiber, prolonged sitting on the toilet, and chronic straining to have a bowel movement (constipation). Pregnancy is a clear cause of enlarged hemorrhoids. Tumors in the pelvis also cause enlargement of hemorrhoids by pressing on veins draining upwards from the anal canal. It is the shearing (pulling) force of stool, particularly hard stool, passing through the anal canal that drags the hemorrhoidal cushions downward. With age or an aggravating condition, the supporting tissue that is responsible for anchoring the hemorrhoids to the underlying muscle of the anal canal deteriorates. With time, the hemorrhoidal tissue loses its mooring and slides down into the anal canal.

One physiological fact that is known about enlarged hemorrhoids that may be relevant to understand why they form is that the pressure is elevated in the anal sphincter, the muscle that surrounds the anal canal and the hemorrhoids. The anal sphincter is the muscle that allows us to control our bowel movements. It is not known, however, if this elevated pressure precedes the development of enlarged hemorrhoids or is the result of the hemorrhoids. Perhaps during bowel movements, increased force is required to force stool through the tighter sphincter. The increased shearing force applied to the hemorrhoids by the passing stool may drag the hemorrhoids downward and enlarge them.

What are the symptoms of hemorrhoids?

There are two types of nerves in the anal canal, visceral nerves (above the dentate line) and somatic nerves (below the dentate line).

Somatic nerves: The somatic (skin) nerves are capable of sensing pain which is like the nerves of the skin.

Visceral nerves: The visceral nerves are like the nerves of the intestines and do not sense pain, only pressure. Therefore, internal hemorrhoids, which are above the dentate line, usually are painless. As the anal cushion of an internal hemorrhoid continues to enlarge, it bulges into the anal canal. It may even pull down a portion of the lining of the rectum above, lose its normal anchoring, and protrude from the anus. This condition is referred to as a prolapsing internal hemorrhoid. In the anal canal, the hemorrhoid is exposed to the trauma of passing stool, particularly hard stools associated with constipation. The trauma can cause bleeding and sometimes pain when stool passes. The rectal lining that has been pulled down secretes mucus and moistens the anus and the surrounding skin. Stool also can leak onto the anal skin. The presence of stool and constant moisture can lead to anal itchiness (pruritus ani), though itchiness is not a common symptom of hemorrhoids. The prolapsing hemorrhoid usually returns into the anal canal or rectum on its own or can be pushed back inside with a finger, but it prolapses again with the next bowel movement.

Less commonly, the hemorrhoid protrudes from the anus and cannot be pushed back inside, a condition referred to as incarceration of the hemorrhoid. Incarcerated hemorrhoids can have their supply of blood shut off by the squeezing pressure of the anal sphincter, and the blood vessels and cushions can die, a condition referred to as gangrene. Gangrene requires medical treatment.

For convenience in describing the severity of internal hemorrhoids, physicians can use a grading system:

  • First-degree hemorrhoids: Hemorrhoids that bleed but do not prolapse.
  • Second-degree hemorrhoids: Hemorrhoids that prolapse and retract on their own (with or without bleeding).
  • Third-degree hemorrhoids: Hemorrhoids that prolapse but must be pushed back in by a finger.
  • Fourth-degree hemorrhoids: Hemorrhoids that prolapse and cannot be pushed back in.

Fourth-degree hemorrhoids also include hemorrhoids that are thrombosed (containing blood clots) or that pull much of the lining of the rectum through the anus. In general, the symptoms of external hemorrhoids are different than the symptoms of internal hemorrhoids.

External hemorrhoids can be felt as bulges at the anus, but they usually cause few of the symptoms that are typical of internal hemorrhoids. This is perhaps, because they are low in the anal canal and have little effect on the function of the anus, particularly the anal sphincter. External hemorrhoids can cause problems, however, when blood clots inside them. This is known as thrombosis. Thrombosis of an external hemorrhoid causes an anal lump that is very painful (because the area is supplied by somatic nerves) and often requires medical attention. The thrombosed hemorrhoid may heal with scarring and leave a tag of skin protruding from the anus. Occasionally, the tag is large, which can make anal hygiene (cleaning) difficult or irritate the anus.

How are hemorrhoids diagnosed?

Most individuals who have hemorrhoids can be discovered them in one of several ways. They either feel the lump of an external hemorrhoid when they wipe themselves after a bowel movement, note drops of blood in the toilet bowl or on the toilet paper, or feel a prolapsing hemorrhoid (protruding from the anus) after bowel movements. Severe anal pain may occur when an external hemorrhoid thrombosis or a prolapsing internal hemorrhoid becomes gangrenous. Symptoms of anal discomfort and itching may occur, but anal conditions other than hemorrhoids are more likely to cause these symptoms than hemorrhoids. (Hemorrhoids often get a "bum rap" for such symptoms since both hemorrhoids and other anal conditions are common and may occur together. For example, up to 20% of individuals with hemorrhoids also have anal fissures.) By the history of symptoms, the physician can suspect that hemorrhoids are present. Although the physician should try his or her best to identify the hemorrhoids, it is perhaps more important to exclude other causes of hemorrhoid-like symptoms that require different treatment. These other causes - anal fissures, fistulae, perianal (around the anus) skin diseases, infections, and tumors - can be diagnosed on the basis of a careful examination of the anus and anal canal. If necessary, scrapings of the anus to diagnose infections and biopsies of the perianal skin to diagnose skin diseases can be done.

External hemorrhoids appear as a bump and/or dark area surrounding the anus. If the lump is gentle, it suggests that the hemorrhoid is thrombosed. Any lump needs to be carefully followed, however, and should not be assumed to be a hemorrhoid since there are rare cancers of the perianal area that may masquerade as external hemorrhoids.

The diagnosis of an internal hemorrhoid is easy if the hemorrhoid protrudes from the anus. Although a rectal examination with a gloved finger may uncover an internal hemorrhoid high in the anal canal, the rectal examination is more helpful in excluding rare cancers that begin in the anal canal and adjacent rectum. A more thorough examination for internal hemorrhoids is done visually using an anoscope. An anoscope is a three-inch long, tapering, metal or clear plastic hollow tube approximately one inch in diameter at its viewing end. The anoscope is lubricated and inserted into the anus, through the anal canal, and into the rectum. As the anoscope is withdrawn, the area of the internal hemorrhoid(s) is well seen. Straining by the patient, as if they are having a bowel movement, may make the hemorrhoid(s) more prominent. For diagnosing anal fissures Anoscopy also is a good way.

At times, indirect anoscopy may be helpful. Indirect anoscopy uses a special mirror for visualizing a patient's anus while the patient is seated and straining on a toilet. Indirect anoscopy allows the doctor to see the effects of gravity and straining on the anus. For example, the physician may be able to determine if what is prolapsing is a hemorrhoid, rectal lining, a rectal polyp, or the rectum itself (a condition called procidentia in which the rectum turns inside out and protrudes from the anus).

Whether or not hemorrhoids are found, if there has been bleeding, the colon above the rectum needs to be examined to exclude important causes of bleeding other than hemorrhoids. Other causes include, for example, colon cancer, polyps, and colitis (inflammation of the rectum and/or colon). This examination can be accomplished by either flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, procedures that allow the doctor to examine approximately one-third or the entire colon, respectively.

General measures

It is believed generally that constipation and straining to have bowel movements promote hemorrhoids and that hard stools can traumatize existing hemorrhoids. It is recommended, therefore, that individuals with hemorrhoids soften their stools by increasing the fiber in their diets. Fiber is found in numerous foodstuffs including fresh and dried fruits, vegetables, grains, and cereals. Generally 20-30 grams per day of fiber are recommended. Supplemental fiber (psyllium, methylcellulose, or calcium polycarbophil) also may be used to increase the intake of fiber. Stool softeners and increased drinking of liquids also may be recommended. Nevertheless, there is no strong, scientific support for the benefits of fiber, liquids, or stool softeners.

Diarrhea is believed to aggravate the symptoms of hemorrhoids and it is recommended that diarrhea be controlled with fiber and anti-motility drugs.

Over-the-counter medications for hemorrhoids

Many over-the-counter products are sold for the treatment of hemorrhoids. These often contain the same drugs that are used for treating anal symptoms such as itching or discomfort. They probably only reduce the symptoms of hemorrhoids. It is possible, however, that their effectiveness relates to their treatment of anal conditions other than hemorrhoids, for example, idiopathic anal itching, that often accompany hemorrhoids. Products used for the treatment of hemorrhoids are available as ointments, creams, gels, suppositories, foams, and pads. Ointments, creams, and gels - when used around the anus - should be applied as a thin covering.

When applied to the anal canal, these products should be inserted with a finger or a "pile pipe." Pile pipes are most efficient when they have holes on the sides as well as at the end. Pile pipes should be lubricated with ointment prior to insertion. Suppositories or foams do not have advantages over ointments, creams, and gels. Most products contain more than one type of active ingredient. Almost all contain a protectant in addition to another ingredient. Only examples of brand-name products containing one ingredient in addition to the protectant are discussed below.

Local anesthetics: Local anesthetics temporarily relieve pain, burning, and itching by numbing the nerve endings. The use of these products should be limited to the perianal area and lower anal canal. Local anesthetics can cause allergic reactions with burning and itching; therefore, if burning and itching increase with the application of anesthetics, they should be discontinued. Local anesthetics include:

  • Benzocaine (Americaine Hemorrhoidal, Lanacane Maximum Strength, Medicone)
  • Dyclonine
  • Benzyl alcohol
  • Dibucaine (Nupercainal)
  • Tetracaine
  • Pramoxine (Fleet Pain-Relief, Procto Foam Non-steroid, Tronothane Hydrochloride)
  • Lidocaine

Antiseptics: Antiseptics inhibit the growth of bacteria and other organisms. However, it is unclear whether antiseptics are any more effective than soap and water.

Examples of antiseptics include:

  • Phenol
  • Cetylpyridinium chloride
  • Boric acid
  • Benzethonium chloride
  • Hydrastis
  • Benzalkonium chloride
  • Resorcinol

Vasoconstrictors: Vasoconstrictors are chemicals that resemble epinephrine, a naturally occurring chemical. Applied to the anus, vasoconstrictors make the blood vessels become smaller, which may reduce swelling. They also may reduce pain and itching due to their mild anesthetic effect. Vasoconstrictors applied to the perianal area - unlike vasoconstrictors that are taken orally or by injection - have a low likelihood of causing serious side effects, such as high blood pressure, nervousness, tremor, sleeplessness, and aggravation of diabetes or hyperthyroidism.

Vasoconstrictors include:

  • Ephedrine sulfate
  • Phenylephrine (Medicone Suppository, Preparation H, Rectacaine)
  • Epinephrine

Protectants: Protectants prevent irritation of the perianal area by forming a physical barrier on the skin that prevents contact of the irritated skin with aggravating liquid or stool from the rectum. This barrier reduces irritation, itching, pain, and burning. There are many products that are themselves protectants or that contain a protectant in addition to other medications. Protectants include:

  • Aluminum hydroxide gel
  • Zinc oxide or calamine (which contains zinc oxide).
  • Cocoa butter
  • White petrolatum
  • Glycerin
  • Kaolin
  • Starch
  • Lanolin
  • Mineral oil (Balneol)

Astringents: Astringents cause coagulation (clumping) of proteins in the cells of the perianal skin or the lining of the anal canal. This action promotes dryness of the skin, which in turn helps relieve burning, itching, and pain. Astringents include:

  • Zinc oxide (Calmol 4, Nupercainal, Tronolane)
  • Calamine
  • Witch hazel (Fleet Medicated, Tucks, Witch Hazel Hemorrhoidal Pads)

Keratolytics: Keratolytics are chemicals that cause the outer layers of skin or other tissues to disintegrate. The rationale for their use is that the disintegration allows medications that are applied to the anus and perianal area to penetrate into the deeper tissues. The two approved keratolytics used are:

  • Resorcinol
  • Aluminum chlorhydroxy allantoinate (alcloxa)

Analgesics: Analgesic products, like anesthetic products, relieve pain, itching, and burning by depressing receptors on pain nerves. Examples of analgesics include:

  • Juniper tar
  • Menthol (greater than 1.0% is not recommended)
  • Camphor (greater than 3% is not recommended)

Corticosteroids: Corticosteroids reduce inflammation and can relieve itching, but their chronic use can cause permanent damage to the skin. They should not be used for more than short periods of a few days to two weeks. Only products with weak corticosteroid effects are available over-the-counter. Stronger corticosteroid products that are available by prescription should not be used for treating hemorrhoids.

Non operative procedures for internal hemorrhoids

There are several non operative treatments for internal hemorrhoids. All of them have the same effect. These procedures cause inflammation in the hemorrhoidal cushions, which then produces scarring. The scarring causes the cushions to shrink and attach to the underlying muscle of the anal canal. This prevents the cushions from being pulled down into the anal canal. These treatments do not require anesthesia since they do not cause pain. (The treated area contains only visceral nerves.)

Sclerotherapy: Sclerotherapy is one of the oldest forms of treatment. During sclerotherapy, a liquid (phenol or quinine urea) is injected into the base of the hemorrhoid. Inflammation sets in, and ultimately scarring takes place. Pain may occur after sclerotherapy but usually subsides by the following day. Symptoms of hemorrhoids frequently return after several years and may require further treatment.

Heat coagulation: There are several treatments that use heat to kill hemorrhoidal tissue and promote inflammation and scarring, including bipolar diathermy, direct-current electrotherapy, and infrared photocoagulation. Such procedures kill the tissues in and around the hemorrhoids and cause scar tissue to form. They are used with first-, second-, and third-degree hemorrhoids. Pain is frequent, though probably less frequent than with ligation and bleeding occasionally occurs. Sclerotherapy, ligation, and heat coagulation are all good options for the treatment of hemorrhoids.

Rubber band ligation: The principle of ligation with rubber bands is to encircle the base of the hemorrhoidal anal cushion with a tight rubber band. The tissue cut off by the rubber band dies and is replaced by an ulcer that heals with scarring. It can be used with first-, second-, and third-degree hemorrhoids and may be more effective than sclerotherapy. Symptoms frequently recur several years later but usually can be treated with further ligation. The recurrence of symptoms may be less with ligation than with sclerotherapy. Pain is the most common complication of ligation, which may occur slightly more often than with sclerotherapy, but it tends to be mild. Bleeding one or two weeks after ligation occurs occasionally and can be severe. Bacterial infection may begin in the tissues surrounding the anal canal (cellulitis). Rarely, the infection spreads to the tissues within the pelvis and results in an abscess, or the infection may enter the bloodstream (sepsis). Infectious complications may be more common in patients who have defective immune systems, for example, from AIDS, cancer, chemotherapy, or severe diabetes.

Cryotherapy: Cryotherapy uses cold temperatures to obliterate the veins and cause inflammation and scarring. It is more time consuming, associated with more post treatment pain, and is less effective than other treatments. Therefore, this procedure is not commonly used.

Surgical procedures

The vast majority of patients with symptom-causing hemorrhoids are able to be managed with non-surgical techniques. In the practice of a surgeon adept at managing hemorrhoids non-operatively, it is estimated that less than 10% of patients require surgery if the hemorrhoids are treated early.

Doppler ligation: Recently, the use of a special, illuminated anoscope with a Doppler probe that measures blood flow has enabled doctors to identify the individual artery that fills the hemorrhoidal vessels. The doctor then can tie off (ligate) the artery. This causes the hemorrhoid to shrink. The Doppler probe is expensive, and seems may offer little advantage over rubber band ligation.

Dilation: Forceful dilation of the anal sphincter by stretching the anal canal has been used to weaken the anal sphincter, the assumption being that the increased sphincter pressure is responsible for the hemorrhoids. Unfortunately, the dilation frequently damages the sphincter itself and many patients become incontinent or unable to control their stool after dilation. For this reason, dilation is rarely used to treat hemorrhoids.

Hemorrhoidectomy: Non-operative treatment is preferred because it is associated with less pain and fewer complications than operative treatment. Surgical removal of hemorrhoids (hemorrhoidectomy) usually is reserved for patients with third- or fourth-degree hemorrhoids. During hemorrhoidectomy, the internal hemorrhoids and external hemorrhoids are cut out. The wounds left by the removal may be sutured (stitched) together (closed technique) or left open (open technique). The results with both techniques are similar. At times, a proctoplasty also is done. A proctoplasty extends the removal of tissue higher into the anal canal so that redundant or prolapsing anal lining also is removed. Postsurgical pain is a major problem with hemorrhoidectomy. Potent pain medications (narcotics) usually are required. The addition of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ketorolac (Toradol), celecoxib (Celebrex), valdecoxib (Bextra) enhances the relief of pain, yet patients still do not return to work for 2-4 weeks.

Following hemorrhoidectomy several other complications may occur. Urinary retention (difficulty urinating) occurs in about 5% of patients. Although retention almost always is transient, it may require catheterization (insertion of a tube) to empty the bladder. Delayed bleeding or hemorrhage 7 to 14 days after surgery occurs in 1%-2% of patients. Narrowing of the anus due to scarring, formation of fissures, and infection (1% of patients) also may occur. Incontinence of stool (inability to control the passage of stool) is uncommon unless the anal sphincter is damaged. Finally, blood clots may form in external hemorrhoids following surgery if they are not removed.

Sphincterotomy: Occasionally, the internal portion of the anal sphincter is partially cut in an attempt to reduce the pressure of the sphincter within the anal canal. This procedure is rarely used alone, and there is concern about incontinence (loss of control) of stool as a potential complication.

Stapled hemorrhoidectomy: This is the newest surgical technique for treating hemorrhoids, and it has rapidly become the treatment of choice for third-degree hemorrhoids. Stapled hemorrhoidectomy is a misnomer since the surgery does not remove the hemorrhoids but, rather, the abnormally lax and expanded hemorrhoidal supporting tissue that has allowed the hemorrhoids to prolapse downward. For stapled hemorrhoidectomy, a circular, hollow tube is inserted into the anal canal. Through this tube, a suture (a long thread) is placed, actually woven, circumferentially within the anal canal above the internal hemorrhoids. The ends of the suture are brought out of the anus through the hollow tube. The stapler (a disposable instrument with a circular stapling device at the end) is placed through the first hollow tube and the ends of the suture are pulled. Pulling the suture pulls the expanded hemorrhoidal supporting tissue into the jaws of the stapler. The hemorrhoidal cushions are pulled back up into their normal position within the anal canal. The stapler then is fired. When it fires, the stapler cuts off the circumferential ring of expanded hemorrhoidal tissue trapped within the stapler and at the same time staples together the upper and lower edges of the cut tissue.

Stapled hemorrhoidectomy, although it can be used to treat second degree hemorrhoids, usually is reserved for higher grades of hemorrhoids - third and fourth degree. If in addition to internal hemorrhoids there are small external hemorrhoids that are causing a problem, the external hemorrhoids may become less problematic after the stapled hemorrhoidectomy. Another alternative is to do a stapled hemorrhoidectomy and a simple excision of the external hemorrhoids. If the external hemorrhoids are large, a standard surgical hemorrhoidectomy may need to be done to remove both the internal and external hemorrhoids.

During stapled hemorrhoidectomy, the arterial blood vessels that travel within the expanded hemorrhoidal tissue and feed the hemorrhoidal vessels are cut, thereby reducing the blood flow to the hemorrhoidal vessels and reducing the size of the hemorrhoids. During the healing of the cut tissues around the staples, scar tissue forms, and this scar tissue anchors the hemorrhoidal cushions in their normal position higher in the anal canal. The staples are needed only until the tissue heals. They then fall off and pass in the stool unnoticed after several weeks. Stapled hemorrhoidectomy is designed primarily to treat internal hemorrhoids, but if external hemorrhoids are present, they may be reduced as well.

Stapled hemorrhoidectomy is faster than traditional hemorrhoidectomy, taking approximately 30 minutes. It is associated with much less pain than traditional hemorrhoidectomy and patients usually return earlier to work. Patients often sense a fullness or pressure within the rectum as if they need to defecate, but this usually resolves within several days. The risks of stapled hemorrhoidectomy include bleeding, infection, anal fissuring (tearing of the lining of the anal canal), narrowing of the anal or rectal wall due to scarring, persistence of internal or external hemorrhoids, and, rarely, trauma to the rectal wall.

Stapled hemorrhoidectomy may be used to treat patients who have both internal and external hemorrhoids; however, it also is an option to combine a stapled hemorrhoidectomy to treat the internal hemorrhoids and a simple resection of the external hemorrhoids.

Hemorrhoids at a Glance

  • Internal hemorrhoids are clumps of tissue within the anal canal that contain blood vessels, muscle, and elastic fibers. External hemorrhoids are enlarged blood vessels surrounding the anus.
  • Internal hemorrhoids cause problems when they enlarge. The cause of the enlargement is not known.
  • Complications of internal hemorrhoids include bleeding, anal itchiness, prolapse, incarceration, and gangrene. Pain is not common.
  • The primary complication of external hemorrhoids is pain due to blood clotting in the hemorrhoidal blood vessels.
  • When dealing with hemorrhoids, it is important to exclude other diseases of the anus and rectum that may cause similar symptoms such as polyps, cancer, and diseases of the skin.
  • Treatment of hemorrhoids includes over-the-counter topical medications, sclerotherapy, rubber band ligation, heat coagulation, cryotherapy, anal dilation, Doppler ligation, sphincterotomy, and surgical hemorrhoidectomy.
  • The newest treatment for hemorrhoids is stapled hemorrhoidectomy.