Free Medical Advice Related to Laparoscopic Surgery

Undesended Testis on both sides
Discussion in 'All Categories' started by HARRY - Sep 6th, 2012 7:15 pm.
HARRY
HARRY
My son has undesended testis problem on both sides. He is now 2 years four months. he had operation on left side testis when he was 9 months, on right side doctor thought will come itself. we had appointment yesturday then docyor inform us right testis did not come down and left testis that they did operation is also not there.they suggest us to do operation again. please suggest us what is right, it will be safe or what we do. please contact me as soon as you can. Thanks
re: Undesended Testis on both sides by Sadhana Mishra - Sep 19th, 2012 6:52 am
#1
Sadhana Mishra
Sadhana Mishra
Dear Harry

You need to get laparoscopic orcheopexy done for your son. Undescended Testes.

I have discussed your case with our consultant and following is the information.

Undescended testicle, or cryptorchidism (the failure of one or more testes to descend from the abdomen into the scrotum) is fairly common. The condition may occur at birth in males, and more often in boys born prematurely. It may also run in families. In many boys, the testis will eventually move down to the normal position, generally within the first six months of life.

Boys are examined after birth to check the position of the testicles. Once an undescended testicle is discovered, it is watched for about six months. If it does not come down, surgical treatment is recommended.

Sometimes older boys will appear to have an undescended testicle even though previous examinations were normal. This is not uncommon, since it is a normal reflex for the testicle to pull upwards under some conditions, starting later in infancy and continuing until puberty. These "retractile" testes do not need surgery if they are clearly down in the scrotum at least part of the time.

After about one year of age, a testicle that has not settled in the scrotum will start to lose some if its fertility potential. If it remains undescended, it may lose its ability to make sperm entirely. Although most boys with one undescended testicle will be able to have children, many of those who have the problem on both sides may be infertile. Moving the testicle to the normal position early in life reduces this risk of infertility.

A hernia is more likely to develop on the side of an undescended testicle. This is because the testicles form in the abdomen, and descend before birth in most cases. In undescended testicles, the connection between the testicle and the abdomen often fails to close as it normally does. Also, torsion (twisting) of the testicle is more likely to occur, which can result in loss of the testicle. There is also a slightly increased risk of testicular cancer in testicles that are undescended. However, since testicular cancer is rare to begin with, it is still uncommon in men who had an undescended testicle. The risk is higher if the testicle was in the abdomen, and there is some evidence that bringing the testicle down during early childhood may reduce this risk.

Surgery is recommended to bring the testicle into the scrotum in order to:

Improve its chances of producing sperm in adulthood
Prevent body-image concerns in the child
Reduce the risk of twisting and hernia
Provide optimal position for regular cancer screening
An undescended testicle may require laparoscopic surgery to determine its location or to verify its existence. If the testicle cannot be felt at all, the belly is examined with a laparoscope (a special telescope used to look inside the body) through a three millimeter incision. If the testicle did not ever form in the first place, the laparoscopy is conclusive. If a testicle is seen in the belly, it can usually be brought down into the proper position through two additional small incisions using miniature instruments.

If the testicle can be felt in the groin, an orchidopexy can be performed. This is an outpatient surgery under anesthesia in which one or more incisions are made through the groin. The tissue supporting the testicle is divided, any hernia is repaired, and the testicle is placed in the scrotum through another tiny incision.

With regards

Sadhana
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