Free Medical Advice | Asesoramiento médico gratuito| मुफ्त चिकित्सा सलाह

High blood pressure in pregnancy
Discussion in 'All Categories' started by Saman - Jan 8th, 2012 12:33 am.
Saman
Saman
I am just 11 weeks pregnant I have started suffering from high blood pressure.this is my second pregnancy and in my first pregnancy I had blood pressure too but that started when I was 8 months pregnant.My first baby got dead because of doctors nelgance as I was havin 170/110 blood pressure n my doctor was still waiting for normal birth.thay had a sudden c section as I was already havin pain but my had had breathing problem and died when he was only 6 days.now another doctor recommended me loprin75..is it safe to have it?
re: High blood pressure in pregnancy by Dr M.K. Gupta - Jan 8th, 2012 11:53 pm
#1
Dr M.K. Gupta
Dr M.K. Gupta
Dear Saman

Although a lot of women that are pregnant with high blood pressure have healthy babies without serious problems, high blood pressure could be dangerous for both the mother and the fetus. Women with pre-existing, or chronic, high blood pressure may have certain complications while pregnant tha individuals with normal blood pressure level. However, some women develop high blood pressure while they are pregnant (known as gestational hypertension).

The results of high blood pressure vary from mild to severe. High blood pressure can harm the mother's kidneys and other organs, and it can cause low birth weight and early delivery. In the most serious cases, the mother develops preeclampsia - or "toxemia of pregnancy"--which can threaten the lives of both the mother and also the fetus.
What Is Preeclampsia?

Preeclampsia is really a condition that typically starts following the 20th week of pregnancy and is related to increased blood pressure level and protein within the mother's urine (as a result of kidney problems). Preeclampsia affects the placenta, also it can affect the mother's kidney, liver, and brain. When preeclampsia causes seizures, the condition is known as eclampsia--the second leading reason for maternal death within the U.S. Preeclampsia is another leading reason for fetal complications, including low birth weight, premature birth, and stillbirth.

There isn't any proven method to prevent preeclampsia. Nearly all women who develop signs of preeclampsia, however, are observed at close range to reduce or avoid related problems. The only method to "cure" preeclampsia is to provide the baby.
How Common Are Hypertension and Preeclampsia in Pregnancy?

Hypertension problems occur in 6 % to eight percent of pregnancies in the U.S., about 70 % of which are first-time pregnancies. In 1998, more than 146,320 cases of preeclampsia alone were diagnosed.

Even though proportion of pregnancies with gestational hypertension and eclampsia has always been about the same in the U.S. over the past decade, the rate of preeclampsia has grown by nearly one-third. This increase arrives in part to a increase in the amount of older mothers and of multiple births, where preeclampsia occurs more often. For instance, in 1998 birth rates among women ages 30 to 44 and also the number of births to women ages 45 and older were at the highest levels in 3 decades, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Furthermore, between 1980 and 1998, rates of twin births increased about 50 percent overall and 1,000 percent among women ages 45 to 49; rates of triplet and other higher-order multiple births jumped more than 400 percent overall, and 1,000 percent among women within their 40s.
Who Is More prone to Develop Preeclampsia?

Women with chronic hypertension (hypertension before becoming pregnant).
Women who developed high blood pressure or preeclampsia during a previous pregnancy, particularly if these conditions occurred at the start of her pregnancy.
Women who are obese prior to pregnancy.
Pregnant women younger than 20 or higher age 40.
Women who are pregnant using more than one baby.
Women with diabetes, kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, or scleroderma.

How's Preeclampsia Detected?

Unfortunately, there isn't any single test to calculate or diagnose preeclampsia. Key signs are increased blood pressure level and protein within the urine (proteinuria). Other symptoms that seem to happen with preeclampsia include persistent headaches, blurred vision or sensitivity to light, and abdominal pain.

All of these sensations can be brought on by other disorders; they can also exist in healthy pregnancies. Regular visits with your doctor help him or her to trace your blood pressure and level of protein inside your urine, to order and analyze blood tests that detect signs and symptoms of preeclampsia, and to monitor fetal development more closely.
Just how can Women with High Blood pressure level Prevent Problems During Pregnancy?

If you are thinking about expecting and you've got hypertension, talk first for your doctor or nurse. Taking steps to manage your blood pressure level before and during pregnancy - and getting regular prenatal care - significantly help toward ensuring your well-being and your baby's health.

Before getting pregnant:

Be sure your blood pressure level is in check. Lifestyle changes such as limiting your salt intake, taking part in regular physical activity, and losing weight if you are overweight can be helpful.
Discuss with your doctor how hypertension might affect you and your baby during pregnancy, and you skill to avoid or lessen problems.

If you take medicines for the blood pressure, ask your physician whether you need to alter the amount you are taking or quit taking them during pregnancy. Experts currently recommend avoiding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and Angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonists during pregnancy; other blood pressure medications may be OK for you to use. Do not, however, stop or improve your medicines unless your doctor lets you know to do so.

While you are pregnant:

Obtain regular prenatal health care.
Avoid alcohol and tobacco.

Talk for your doctor about any over-the-counter medications you are taking or are thinking about taking.

Does Hypertension or Preeclampsia During Pregnancy Cause Long-Term Heart and Blood Vessel Problems?

The results of hypertension during pregnancy vary depending on the disorder along with other factors. According to the National Hypertension Education Program (NHBPEP), preeclampsia doesn't in general increase a woman's risk for developing chronic hypertension or other heart-related problems. The NHBPEP also reports that in females with normal blood pressure level who develop preeclampsia after the 20th week of the first pregnancy, short-term complications--including increased blood pressure--usually disappear within about About six weeks after delivery.

Some women, however, might be more likely to develop high blood pressure or other heart disease later in life. More research is needed to determine the long-term health effects of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and to develop better means of identifying, diagnosing, and treating women at risk for these conditions.

Even though high blood pressure and related disorders during pregnancy could be serious, nearly all women rich in blood pressure level and those who develop preeclampsia have successful pregnancies. Obtaining early and regular prenatal care is an essential reaction you can have for you and your baby.

With regards
M.K. Gupta
Post Reply
Name *
Email * Will be hidden from visitors
Your Picture * Limit 2Mb please
 *
Enter verification code Simple catpcha image
*
* - required fields
 

 

Get Free Postoperative Advice

Laparoscopic Surgery Training

If you have a surgical concern and can’t reach a doctor right away, or you’re not sure where else to ask a qualified laparoscopic surgeon, you can get our Medical Help through this Forum of World Laparoscopy Hospital which is available 24 hours a day, Just fill-up the form given and within few our the answer of your question will be posted on this forum. Please keep in mind we answer the question only related to laparoscopic surgery. You can also search and browse thousands of answer already posted on this forum

Using Free Medical Advice Related to Laparoscopic Surgery Service, you can send your questions to our Laparoscopic Surgeon and the Doctor will reply within few hour. It’s as if you are having an email exchange with your very own private surgeon! As soon as you post your question, a qualified laparoscopic surgeon will start answering it. Our expert can help you learn more about the treatment and procedure options available to you for different health problems and diseases.They’ll also give you information to discuss with your doctor when deciding what kind of surgical treatment is best for you.

The Doctor will provide you with the all the medical information you need, and will guide you as you choose a course of action, all from the comfort of your home or office. No more sitting in the waiting room for hours just to get some basic information from your laparoscopic surgeon; no more self-diagnosis after reading pages and pages of confusing and contradictory Online information.

World Laparoscopy Hospital gives you the personalized health information you need to decide on the right treatment for you. The information that you provide will be seen by every person for education and information purpose so please not write your real name.

In case of any problem in asking free medical advice please contact | RSS

World Laparoscopy Hospital, Cyber City, Gurugram, NCR Delhi, 122002, India

All Inquiries

Tel: +91 124 2351555, +91 9811416838, +91 9811912768, +91 9999677788



Need Help? Chat with us
Click one of our representatives below
Nidhi
Hospital Representative
I'm Online
×