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abdominal muscles will not release after weight lift
Discussion in 'All Categories' started by matt perrett - Jan 22nd, 2012 3:56 pm.
matt perrett
matt perrett
October 2010 I did 110 kg deadlift. Since the following day I have had pain through my left inguinal region. I also have constant tightness through my left oblique region which affect free abdominal breathing. I have had over a year of conservative treatments. My hip/inguinal pain has subsided mostly. Abdominal tightness through left oblique and front left abdomen remains. I have a very unstable lumbar spine. My sports physio believes all my symptoms are being referred by nerves in my spine. I have had MRI, x-ray and ultrasound. With no sign of abnormalities. Is it possible that some of the muscle fibres in the left abdomen might be laying over each other and won't release? Do you think it's worth having a look inside abdomen with the view to more thorough diagnosis? Do you think it's worth going to see a Neurologist?
re: abdominal muscles will not release after weight lift by Dr M.K. Gupta - Jan 26th, 2012 9:18 pm
#1
Dr M.K. Gupta
Dr M.K. Gupta
Dear Perrett

After injury most important think is to take complete rest and allow the injured tissue to recover. The Looking inside the abdomen will not give any additional pathology if MRI and other tests are normal. Probably the most common weight training injuries involve the lower back. The mechanisms of damage include hyperflexion, hyperextension, torsion, and overdevelopment and excessive tightening from the iliopsoas muscles.

The most common back troubles are mechanical sprains and strains; however, disc injury or spondylolisthesis could also occur. Spondylolisthesis may be due to the stress imposed at the neural arch while performing exercises which involve repetitive lumbar spine flexion and extension under load. It is particularly so of dead-lifts.

According to statical data available the best number of weight training-related back injuries derive from exercises in which the trainee is incorporated in the flexed posture, such as rows and dead-lifts.

A bent barbell row is often performed standing with heavy weight held at arm's length while bent in the waist and the legs held straight. It creates probably the greatest quantity of contractile tension on the lumbar spine musculature and also the greatest lumbar disc pressure.

A frequent error is to allow the to round after which to jerk the weight up while using hip muscles to create power. Lumbar flexion while lifting results in the load being shifted from the back muscles towards the posterior ligaments, the thoracolumbar fascia, and also the lumbar discs. The low back muscles stop contracting once the spine is sufficiently flexed, a phenomenon known as the flexion relaxation response of the erector spinae.

It may lead to injury to ligaments or discs. The seated cable row exercise can even lead to a hyperflexion problems for the lumbar spine, a problem often encountered in this author's practice. The injury usually is a result of leaning forward in the starting place of every rep, allowing the spine to flex, in an effort to get a good stretch.

Extremely heavy weights are occasionally utilized in weightlifting exercises. As much as 1,000 lb can be used in the squat and dead-lift. While steadily applied compressive forces alone rarely injure the disc, rupture of the vertebral end plate or fatigue microfractures from the trabeculae of the vertebral bodies may result.

Study reveals that retired heavyweight lifters exhibit significantly greater reduction of disc height on X-ray in contrast to controls.

Recommendations for Preventing Mid back Injuries While Weight Training

1. Keep your lower back in the neutral (lordotic) position throughout the performance of most lifts, such as dead-lifts, rows, and squats. To maintain this position lightly co-contract the abdominals and also the glutes, making sure to prevent hyperextension. Abdominal co-contraction helps you to raise intra-abdominal pressure and stiffen the spine. A weight-lifting belt could also facilitate maintaining this posture. If required employing trunk stabilization exercises as a regular part of your exercise routine may help you learn to maintain this posture.

2. Keep the knees a minimum of slightly bent during all rowing and flexed exercises.

3. Keep your trunk as vertical as possible during squats.

4. Avoid hip flexor dominant abdominal exercises. These exercises include straight leg raises, Roman Chair leg raises, full sit-ups, and many abdominal machines, especially those in which the feet are hooked in. To decrease psoas involvement during crunches, plantar flex the feet and pull down using the heels to contract the hamstrings.

5. Maintain adequate strength and endurance in the lumbar extensor muscles.

6. Perform repeated prone extensions (cobra) just before training and following all abdominal training that involves spinal flexion.

7. Avoid rotational exercises for that obliques such as twists and rotary torso machines, if you aren't involved in sports by which rotation forces commonly occur. Substitute diagonal and lateral movements instead.

8. Keep your hamstrings, psoas, and other hip muscles flexible through regular, slow, static stretching. Avoid standing bent-over stretches because these can overstretch the posterior ligaments of the spine.

With regards
M.K. Gupta
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