Gastric Bypass Surgery - The Benefits and Harm of Gastric Bypass

Roux En Y Gastric Bypass

The Benefits Of Gastric Bypass

Gastric surgery is one of the most common weight-loss surgeries, in the United States alone about 140,000 procedures are conducted yearly. There are people who have undergone surgery would report about 60% of improvement in their body weight. There are others, who would report as much as 80% of weight loss. The effects of the surgery would be most felt after a year, where most patients would report to be at their lowest weight. However, there could still be tendencies that the lost weight may be regained especially if the dietary and exercise recommendations are not followed. After all, reducing your food intake is not the only way to lose weight and maintain it. Gastric bypass is a procedure done to address issues of severe obesity. There are associated conditions with obesity like diabetes, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, obstructive sleep apnea and the gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are about 80% of patients with hypertension will be off medication significant time after the surgery. The same goes for 90% of diabetic patients who will not be dependent on insulin. It could even reduce the patient’s risk of having heart disease and cancer. Because of the weight loss, gastric bypass surgery could help a person improve mobility and flexibility. Gastric bypass surgery could lessen asthma attacks and reducing dependence to medication or inhaler. Arthritis, fatigue, joint pain and shortness of breath due to physical movements are also reduced by weight loss brought by surgery.

Being extremely overweight could have significant effect on the bladder and other organs of the body. They get too much pressure increasing stress incontinence. It could also cause hormonal problems which could lead to infertility. There are studies showing that after undergoing the bypass, 90% of infertility is restored. Because of the weight-loss, there are patients who claimed that they increased their confidence and well-being is improved. There are studies showing that those who have undergone surgery would usually experience depression and anxiety. Counselling and support would help the individual to recover and the psychological effects could be lessened or could disappear. The National Institute of Health, said that patients who have undergone bypass showed “dramatic and sustained” improvements in how they live their lives. They were able to go beyond the results of weight loss and improve their over-all life. They have higher self- esteem and higher energy levels after the surgery. For example, gastric bypass surgeries that have been performed to obese teens were able to improve the quality of life within six months, some studies say. Aside from weight loss, their health improves and starts to become appropriate for their age. They were also able to socialize better and deal with peer pressure. However, it is important to understand that aside from the numerous benefits you can get from gastric bypass surgeries, there are also risks just like any other medical intervention or surgery. Morbidly obese patients have higher risks in surgeries compared with those who are not morbidly obese. It is important to weigh our options before we proceed to any procedure.

Slimming Down Shortcut: Getting A Gastric Bypass

It's been quite noticeable in some celebrities: the sudden weight loss and return to a svelte figure is often touted to the result of liposuction or a lot of dedication in the gym. But there are some celebrities that have gone that extra mile and had a gastric bypass. That may sound like some sort of heavy surgical procedure but it's actually one of the more easy to handle weight-loss surgeries. Getting a gastric bypass is a pretty simple process, you just have to go to your local hospital and consult with a surgeon. They obviously won't just let you have one willy-nilly, of course, there are several guidelines that limit the administering of a gastric bypass procedure to someone. The main things that restrict any prospective recepient of the procedure are the following: the patient must have been obese for more than five years, the patient must also not have a history of alcoholism and psychological disorders. Finally, the person should not be younger than eighteen years old and no older than sixty-five years old. If you fit all of these categories, you'll also be judged if you have exhausted all other weight-loss measures for yourself. This is because it may be one of the safer surgeries that can be done, a gastric bypass is still a major operation and cannot be taken lightly.

If you do pass all of these tests, then you'll be up for the procedure. Here's a simple explanation of it: it is essentially, having your stomach capacity lessened and making your digestive tract skip a part of your small intestine. To go into the nitty-gritty of it, the procedure creates a small pouch in the upper part of your stomach, usually via surgical staples or a plastic band. This stomach pouch is usually small – it can get to the size a walnut for some procedures. After this pouch is created, the middle of your small intestine, the jejunum, is connected to it. This means your food will skip the main part of your stomach and your duodenum, the upper portion of your small intestine. The result is lower stomach capacity and a lower calorie intake. You will be able to satisfy your appetite more quickly and have less calories inside your system, creating a consistent and quick weight loss for you until your body has adapted to it. It may sound easy but still it's a long road after a gastric bypass. After the four-hour operation you will be under observation for the next few days, while being limited to liquids only so that your stomach can heal. After five days you can be released from the hospital but your ordeal won't end there. For the next twelve weeks, you will be following a diet that will slowly progress you from liquids to solids, getting you new stomach used to the strain. Even then, you will have to deal with some of the side-effects your whole life – lower energy intake can be detrimental to your health, while over-eating can cause you to vomit or feel great pain, so a gastric bypass should be a last resort for anyone who's suffering from obesity.

What You Gain and Lose from Gastric Bypass Surgery

Obesity is a serious health problem across the globe. That is why a number of methods, techniques, and technologies have been developed to help curb weight problems that usually lead to life-threatening diseases such as heart ailments and diabetes. One of the most popular weight loss strategies is gastric bypass surgery, a procedure that alters the digestive system (particularly the stomach) to restrain a person’s food intake. The results of the surgery are immediate a patient may lose 50 to 60 percent of his weight within two years following the surgery. With healthy lifestyle (including proper diet and regular exercise), one can expect weight loss in the long run after the surgery. Those who are overweight will experience easier mobility and better quality of life after undergoing weight loss surgery. But there’s more to this surgery than just weight loss. Aside from slashing off some figures from the weighing scale, the surgery also helps improve certain conditions that are often linked to obesity. These health problems include high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, high blood cholesterol, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Thus, people who have gone through weight loss surgery are less likely to develop cardiovascular problems than those who have not tried the procedure. Also, the surgery can lessen a patient’s possibility of death due to heart ailment, diabetes, or cancer.

Now for the not-so good news. Weight loss surgery is not for the faint of hearts. As with other kinds of surgeries, weight loss surgery leads to several complications. If you will go through this procedure, you need to know the risks before you head over the clinic or hospital. Being aware of what to expect after the surgery helps a lot in your recovery process. The most common complications of the surgery include infection, bleeding, and swelling. Other complications are ulcer, low blood sugar, kidney stones, gallstones, iron deficiency anemia, and vitamin D and B-12 deficiency. After the operation, a patient may also experience vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness especially when eating foods rich in sugar and fat. These are caused by a condition called dumping syndrome in which the contents of the stomach pass through the small intestine very fast.

There are certain postoperative risks that occur in rare cases but are severe and need immediate medical attention. The following are some of the complications and tips on how to deal with them.

  1. Leak in the stomach: This is found at one of the staple lines in the stomach. The leak heals over time in most cases, though it can be treated using antibiotics. But severe cases require immediate surgery.
  2. Thinning of the opening between the small intestine and stomach: This condition needs either a corrective surgery or a simple outpatient procedure wherein a tube is inserted through the mouth to make the opening wider.
  3. Incision hernia or weakness in the incision: This complication happens if the surgery is an open procedure that involves a large incision on the abdomen. Incision hernia needs to be repaired through surgery depending on the severity of the condition.
  4. Death: For every 200 to 300 weight loss surgeries, one case results in death. Although the risk of death has been linked to gastric bypass surgery, it still depends on many factors such as age and health and medical conditions.

Understanding Gastric Bypass

Gastric bypass surgery is done to primarily solve or treat morbid or severe obesity and other health problems associated with it. With this procedure the stomach is made smaller. The food will bypass part of the small intestine. By doing so, the patient will consume less because he feels full immediately. Getting full easily would reduce the calories taken by the body and eventually lead to weight loss. Actually, gastric bypass is just among the many similar operations to reduce obesity. To refer all of these procedures, bariatric surgery is the term. These operations intend to reduce accumulated fatty tissues by altering the physiological and psychological attitude of a patient towards food and eating.

How does it alter normal digestion?

What normally happens is that after eating, the food would go through the stomach and then proceed to the small intestine. The nutrients are absorbed in the small intestine before it goes to the large intestine where waste is eventually pushed out of the body. The most common gastric bypass procedure, the Roux-en Y gastric bypass, alters this process. In the Roux-en gastric bypass, a small pouch is made on the top part of the stomach. The lower part of the stomach, which is much smaller now, is connected directly to the middle part of the small intestine. The stomach was made smaller and at the same time, the intestine was cut short, the upper portion of the small intestine was bypassed. Both the upper portion of the stomach and the small intestine no longer digest food. Statistics showed that patients would lose 60%, on the average, of their weight after the gastric bypass surgery. There are even who would say that they have lost 80% of their weight. There are studies showing that about 90% of patient who have undergone gastric surgery were able to maintain their weight loss after ten years of having the surgery performed. Having gastric surgery is not risk-free though. People who have undergone this procedure would report more cases of gallstones, in other studies, they would also report nutritional issues like anemia or osteoporosis. Every year there are about 140,000 gastric procedure being performed in the United States alone. The results could really be successful, with people being able to get better weight-loss results, however, about 2% of patients would find it very fatal. In the 2%, one percent could be as a result of complications during surgery. The heart in unable to support the pumping it has to do to handle the excess weight or the complication brought by it. The other one percent cause of fatality among people who gone through the procedure, would be about not following the dietary restrictions that should be followed after the surgery. After gastric surgery, the body could no longer handle too much intake of high-sugar and high-fat food. There is a special diet that those who have just undergone the surgery should follow. Bypass diet would usually include foods that are high in protein but low in fat, fiber, calories, and sugar. There are vitamins and mineral supplements that are required to be taken to avoid health and nutritional deficiencies. With more and more people turning to gastric bypass surgery as a weight-loss option, it is important to understand not only the procedure and the benefits. It is also important to weigh the risks and if our lifestyle and our body would be able to handle the dramatic loss of weight.