Complication of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

 

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Although with the increasing experience of surgeron complications are decreasing but serious complications that occur with laparoscopic cholecystectomy, including bile duct injury, bile leaks, bleeding and bowel injury result in part from patient selection, surgical inexperience, and the technical constraints that are inherent to the minimally invasive approach. A major mode of ductal injury is diathermy burns, which may initially go unnoticed and usually involve the right or common hepatic ducts. These factors, as well as intrinsic sequelae of biliary tract diseases, such as inflammation and scarring, have led to the concept of stop rule for surgeons performing this operation. In essence, if a safe dissection cannot be ensured laparoscopically, early conversion to an open approach should be readily accepted as the proper course.

Bile duct injury, bile leaks, bleeding and bowel injury lead to part from patient selection, surgical inexperience, and the technical constraints. These factors are inherent towards the non-invasive approach and therefore are the intense complications that occur with laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Diathermy burns is a major mode of ductal injury, which might primarily go unnoticed in most cases involve the right or common hepatic ducts. These 4 elements, along with intrinsic squeal of b biliary tract diseases, such as inflammation and scarring, have led to surgeons performing this operation underneath the idea of "Stop Rules". Open surgery could be accepted if laparoscopic surgery cannot ensure a safe dissection.

Abdominal cut is not needed in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, resulting in less pain, improved cosmetic results, quicker healing and much less complications for example infection and adhesions. Most patients could be discharged on a single or even the next day the surgery, and will be fit revisit any type of occupation within per week. Furthermore, some surgeons also use flexible instrument for laparoscopic surgeries.

Cholecystectomy can also be performed through a single incision within the navel using the SPIDER surgical system. Recovery time of these patients is usually very small, and has an almost invisible scar. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy continues to be endorsed as a effective and safe surgical procedure for gallbladder removal, equal in efficacy towards the traditional open surgery with a Consensus Development Conference panel, convened by the National Institutes of Health in September 1992.

The panel noted, however, that only experienced surgeons should perform Laparoscopic Cholesytectomy and just on patients having symptoms of gallstones. In addition, the panel noted that the training, experience, skill, and judgment of the surgeon performing the procedure greatly influence the end result of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, the panel recommended that strict guidelines be produced for training and granting credentials in laparoscopic surgery, determining competence, and monitoring quality. Based on the experts, it is important to develop minimally invasive method of gallstone treatment that will not only eliminate existing stones, but additionally prevent their formation or recurrence.