Foreword

Dr. Ray. L. GreenIn less than ten years so much has happened in the very young field of laparoscopic surgery.  We are at a major crossroads in the approach to surgical problems that will be chronicled as the most important transition of our century: large incision surgery to micro incision surgery.
The laparoscope has literally revolutionized both general surgery and gynecology.  As new procedures are developed, surgeons want to offer their patients the benefits of smaller wounds, less postoperative stress, shorter hospital stay.  This rapid acceptance of laparoscopic surgery has come at a high price to some patients, however, when complications unique to this approach have lead to prolonged hospitalisation or death.
In the 1970’s, practicing gynecologists had taken to laparoscopy by the thousands because of the “simple” sterilization techniques and the diagnostic opportunities for chronic infertility and pelvic pain.  Unique, puzzling complications of vessel injury and bowel and skin burns, as well as sterilization failures, rapidly made “simple” laparoscopic surgery problems the leading cause of gynecologic law suits. 
In the 1990’s, general surgeons are embracing the laparoscope as enthusiastically and innocently as gynecologists did in the 1970’s and are seeing unique and disastrous complications:  who had ever heard of a common iliac artery injury during a cholecystectomy?  The World Association of Laparoscopic Surgeons responded to these problems with the same high purpose as the AAGL had by organizing teaching courses reviewing complications so as to prevent them.  Today’s most common complications are vessel and bowel injury during trocar entry, anatomic errors, and the vagaries of electric current in tissue.  Turns out these are pretty much the same as the problems were in the 1970’s, despite the constant advent of “new, improved” instruments in laparoscopy.
Textbook of Practical Laparoscopic Surgery represents an historical landmark and is a must for all surgeons and Gynaecologist. The chapters are comprehensive, well written and up-to-date. The layout and general presentation is superb with several colour illustrations throughout. The detail covered in each chapter is all encompassing and spans areas such as ergonomics of Minimal Access Surgery, Laparoscopic anatomy and the basic principles of Laparoscopy. In addition to surgical techniques, the this book provides a broader focus on issues pertaining to laparoendoscopic surgery, such as telerobotic surgery, use of simulators in training, and a comprehensive look at credentialing past, present, and future.
I recommend this textbook without hesitation.

DR.RAY L. GREEN
DIPLOMATE OF AMERICAN BOARD OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
FELLOW AMERICAN COLLEGE OF OBSTETRICIAN AND GYNECOLOGIST
Presedent of WORLD ASSOCIATION OF LAPAROSCOPIC SURGEONS (USA)